How Do You Present A Good Resume?

Everyone advises you that it’s crucial to begin your resume with an impressive introduction that creates a powerful initial

impression … “You only have 20 seconds” is the usual advice.

It’s true. Recruiters are busy. They receive hundreds of resumes for every job, which means being noticed is crucial.
But how do you accomplish this? The good thing is, it’s nearly as difficult as you imagine.

Here are a few ways to present your resume with a good impact that makes it difficult for recruiters to not notice your application.

Be Yourself

If you’re anything like the majority of us when it’s time to compose your resume, you browse the internet seeking ideas. In fact, this is the way you could have stumbled across this site.

However, it’s a bad decision and here’s the reason. You’re not like the others. On our sample page, there are over 50 examples of resumes, each carefully created to convey the strengths, traits of personality experience, and distinctive advantages of a particular individual that is not you.

If you’re searching the internet to find resume examples, put them down. Seriously. Stop it!

You’re incredible. You possess talents, abilities, and experiences that no other person in the world has, at the very least, not in that special combination. Instead of looking at what other people have shared about themselves, you should start your resume by describing exactly what makes you unique and valuable.

Concentrate On Value

I didn’t say “tell people about what you are that makes you different. I don’t suggest including it on your resume. Uniqueness isn’t enough. My phrase to describe myself was “uniquely valuable.” Ask yourself: What combination of my skills, experience, and traits make me attractive to potential employers?”

If you can answer that question you will have the key message that will prompt employers to invite you to interview.

If, for instance, I were to submit my application for a job in the development of an online training program for job-seekers I would like to emphasize a few things that, when taken together create a distinct candidate.

I am a ten-year veteran in the development of curriculum and training design. I am a seasoned professional with 10 years working with On-Point Recruiting and during that time, my company has assisted thousands of job-seekers to get new jobs.

The following outline of my experience is what marketers would describe as product features. The following are facts of my experience. In order to make a lasting impression, I must explain to the public how these features will benefit them.

It Is Possible To Suggest

I can offer a rare mix of training, recruitment resume writing, and career coaching experience. This implies that I have a deep understanding regarding the recruitment process both from a professional and a personal perspective and creating adult education programs that actually are effective.

Make this a priority for yourself and your resume will be sure to be noticed immediately because it addresses the primary needs of prospective employers.

If Necessary, Break The Rules

When you’re writing your resume, it’s restricted by all sorts of guidelines you’ve learned from others. My favorite rule is one that says “your resume should only be one-page long” rule.

Who is to say? Did all hiring managers, recruiters, and HR managers attend an educational course in which they were told that this was the norm and that they should not consider any person who did not follow it?

Absolutely not! It’s just something somebody said and then it was noticed and then communicated to others. It’s now causing millions of people across the globe to create resumes that aren’t as effective as they could be.

The reality is that it’s impossible to create an impressive resume that reflects your personal style if you’re still adhering to the rules and conventions. They don’t work together.

Take note in the example above that I created my value proposition overview from the perspective of the primary person. Here’s the second example:
I can offer a rare mix of training, recruitment, and resume writing, as well as career coaching, which means I have a deep understanding regarding the recruitment process both from a professional and a personal perspective and being able to design adult learning programs that are effective.

The standard resume conventions state that this isn’t true and that you shouldn’t make use of “I” in your resume. I’m not saying that’s a lie. Sometimes employing “I” is the perfect method to directly address the manager hiring you by delivering an effective sales pitch.

However, this doesn’t mean your resume has to be just two pages (maybe it could be three pages? Perhaps one?). It doesn’t mean you need to utilize “I” in your resume. It’s not the case at all. It’s just that you must always decide on your resume based upon what’s the most effective marketing message for you and not on a rule of thumb that is designed to force everyone to conform.

Here’s a sample resume that makes use of “I” effectively to introduce the applicant to prospective employers.

Use Testimonials

Recruiters are wary of risk. They want to make certain that they do not commit a costly mistake when hiring. Thus, among the most important ways to do this is to prove, from the very beginning of your resume’s introduction, that you are an excellent candidate. I prefer to prove this with testimonials, either from LinkedIn or review letters or performance evaluations. If you could reference the person you are referring to, your pitch will be more persuasive.

Show Don’t Just Tell

If you’ve ever taken a creative writing course you’ve heard of the phrase “show don’t tell.” In the realm of creative writing, this means the importance of expressing a character’s feelings through actions rather than simply telling the story of those emotions.
When I say this phrase in reference to your resume I’m making reference to the exact aspect. In lieu of telling others, you’re amazing, I want you to demonstrate it.

I’ve had 3 jobs over the last 10 years, and have consistently grown sales at a minimum of 50%. This is the case to the point of my latest position in which I increased sales by 62% in spite of a general recession in the industry.

Which one of these people would you be the most interested in having a conversation with? And do you really care about “I” as

his “I” word? or if his resume is three pages long?

Naturally, not all are able to quantify their contribution by this method since there aren’t many people working in sales. However, if you consider it long enough, you will be able to identify specific facts about your accomplishments that are more revealing than telling.

Perhaps, for instance, you’ve outperformed your colleagues or have won awards or received promotions at each of your positions. Perhaps you’re the educator who goes that extra mile or the sales rep who is 100% satisfied with the mystery shopper visit. It’s important to remember that doing something that shows will always have more impact than telling, and getting it done sooner instead of later can help your resume go out with an oomph.

Conclusion

To stand out it is essential to highlight your unique qualities right at the beginning of the resume. If you do this, you’ll see your resume responds faster. Before you send another resume, ask yourself if it truly starts with the pump. In the event that it is, you’re overloaded with interviews. If not, try one of these methods to get the impact you’re hoping for.